Podcast 2017 Episode 2 – Race Coverage and Podium Presenters

January 20, 2017 Leave a comment

Podcast logoThis week we catch up on all the Australian nationals results, the cyclocross nationals and the Women’s Tour Down Under along with a detailed and robust conversation about how hard it is (or isn’t) to provide race highlights. Sarah’s been suffering with a terrible lung infection and manages to only cough up parts of her internal organs, while keeping the entire episode actually within reasonable bounds. It’s the unicorn episode kid. (1:00:51 MIN / 57.06 MB)

You can also always sign up for automated downloads via the iTunes store or via our RSS feed here.

Sarah is going to be giving two free talks next week – at the Roll for the Soul bike cafe in Bristol, on Thursday 26th January, and via link into BFF Bikes on Saturday 28th – click through those links and sign up!

Things we talked about this week

This week’s racing

Videos and media from:

Fiuggi Cyclocross World Cup

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The 2017 Santos Women’s Tour (Down Under!) – videos, media, results and more

January 17, 2017 Leave a comment

We’ve just finished the first race on the 2017 UCI women’s cycling road race calendar, the Santos Women’s Tour at the Tour Down Under.  Two crits, a long and a short road race, and a huge field of amazing riders.  The official hour of highlights will be out on 5th February, but luckily for us, there were teams out at the race making highlights films, photo galleries, race reports, and lots of tweets.

Here’s my collection of race media – and as always, please do let me know if I’ve missed anything, in the comments or on twitter, and I’ll edit it in.

The awesome Chicks Who Ride Bikes made illicit (fantastic!) live roadside videos every day, and you can find those on their Facebook – check them all out.  Photo galleries fr

Stage 1 – the longer road race

(Tiny) highlights from the race:

Team videos from ORICA-Scott, Rapha Films for Canyon-SRAM, and Wiggle High5

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On pitchforks, patience, demand, and the Tour Down Under

January 16, 2017 Leave a comment

We’re at the first stage race of 2017, the Santos Women’s Tour, and it’s time for the first women’s cycling polemica of the season.  It’s a familiar cry, “why can’t we see more of the racing?”, with a lot of people going further, with “why can’t we watch live?”, and the familiar response that seems to chide fans for wanting more.  I have feelings about this, as you can imagine.

Let’s start with some background.  The Santos Women’s Tour (SWT) is a four-stage race alongside the men’s Tour Down Under – two crits, and two road races (one under 80km long).  It’s the first UCI road race of 2017, and has a great field that have been Down Under for winter sunshine, training camps, non-UCI races like the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic and the Aussie Road Nationals, as well as the UCI-ranked Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race on 28th January.  It’s always exciting, seeing the teams in their new iterations (and new kits), and with the loss of the Tour de San Luís and the Ladies Tour of Qatar, the status has risen.

Now, although it’s nominally part of the Tour Down Under, they have different race organisers, though the sponsor, website and social media present them as two sides of the same coin – and the races are both owned by South Australian Government, which has used the Santos Women’s Tour as evidence of their commitment to promote women’s sport.  So it’s a surprise to see the men’s and women’s races treated differently.  The Pre-TDU People’s Choice Classic, the men’s crit that’s on the same course and day as the SWT Stage 2 Crit, for example, was streamed live, with two highlights videos on the Tour Down Under YouTube (one 4:21 long, and the 1:19 finish video), plus a “fan cam”, and 1:57 long winner’s interview, while at this point there’s only a 1:47 long video covering Stages 1 & 2 of the women’s race combined.  For context, compare that to the 1:34 video of the Undies Run at the race.

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How to follow the 2017 Santos Women’s Tour

January 13, 2017 1 comment

The first Stage Race of 2017 is about to start – the Santos Women’s Tour.  It runs from 14-17th January 2017, and is part of the Australian summer season.  It’s two Crits, and two road races, alongside the men’s Tour Down Under.

Now, the bad news is that there’ll be no livestreaming of the race.  Yes, it’s depressing, and it’s partly because the race has a different organisation to the men’s race.  It’s really interesting to see how, after 2016 had a real increase of the numbers of women’s races being streamed, fans are less willing to accept “it is what it is” as a reason for no streaming – and rightly so.

But we can follow it live, via twitter.  The hashtag is #TDUwomens (which feels wrong, but is the one the race is using) and the race has two accounts, @TourDownUnder, and @SantosTDU_Live for live updates.  Hopefully there’ll also be updates from Cycling Australia, the Summer of Cycling account, and I always love the way Jessi Braverman live-tweets races.

The race is in South Australia, in the ACDT timezone – half an hour behind Aussie AEDT, 10.5 hours ahead of UK GMT, 9.5 hours ahead of European CET and 15.5 hours ahead of North American EST.

Timings:

  • Stage 1, Saturday 14th January, 11am ACDT (11:30am AEDT, 00:30am GMT, 01:30 CET,  7:30pm 13th EST)
  • Stage 2 Crit, 15th January, 5:45pm ACDT (6:15pm AEDT, 7:15am GMT, 08:15 CET, 2:15am EST)
  • Stage 3, 16th January, 11am ACDT (11:30am AEDT, 00:30am GMT, 01:30 CET,  7:30pm 13th EST)
  • Stage 4 Crit, 17th January, 6:30pm ACDT (7pm AEDT, 8am GMT, 09:00 CET, 3am EST)

You can find information on the race on the race website, including the startlist and a preview.  I also love the preview on Ella Cycling Tips, and there are more previews on VeloRooms and Road & Mud, and team-specific previews by ORICA-Scott and Wiggle High5.

Wiggle also have video previews, and will doubtless have lots of in-race video highlights  too, on their YouTube, and  I’ll also be looking for team video highlights from the ORICA-Scott YT and Canyon-SRAM on Rapha Films.  I’ll be looking for race highlights videos from SBS Cycling Central, Cycling Australia and on the TDU YouTube who some good pre-race videos  – and because this is Australia, there’s the usual riders-with-wildlife fun to enjoy.

I’ll put up a collection of race media here after the race, and I’ll be adding it to my Women’s Cycling Tumblr and on my twitter as I find it – if you have more tips to watch, let me know here, or on twitter, and I’ll edit them in.

Who won the 2017 Cyclocross National Championships? The big video collection!

January 10, 2017 Leave a comment

The National Cyclocross Championships have moved to January, and it was a fantastic weekend for live women’s cycling, with the Dutch Champs having the women as the Main Event, so we could flip from live Belgium to live Netherlands women, before heading to the USA.  Such an amazing luxurious day of race after race!

I’ve said it a lot this season, but wow, things have changed so much, so quickly, in terms of cyclocross broadcasting for women.  Just a few years ago, I felt lucky to see highlights of the women’s World Champs, and 5 minutes of a race was a luxury, but now I can watch all three major series without going near a dodgy stream – AND most races on my actual TV too!  CX is now the cycling discipline that is most accessible, in terms of watching women’s racing, and everyone who’s worked on that should be so proud, especially the people at Sporza.  It’s glorious!

Of course there are still some countries that could do with improvement, but this weekend demonstrates why – and that it’s completely possible to provide more than 2 minutes highlights.  Strap in for some great videos, photos and media – and of course, if there are any that I’ve missed, please do tell me, in the comments or on twitter, and I’ll edit them in.

The Netherlands

As always, it’s the Dutch Cyclocross Championships that has the biggest field in terms of most riders who could win, with a current and former World Champion lining up.  But from the first lap, there was one rider head-and-shoulders above the rest…

(If anyone can find the full replay anywhere, please do let me know – I love that it was all live!)

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Podcast 2017 Episode 1 – Is the World Tour Less Worldly?

January 4, 2017 Leave a comment

Podcast logoIt’s the first week of 2017 and we’re already knees deep in a whole bunch of racing, it’s been fantastic! Dan anoints another honorary Australian and we celebrate the joys of the diversity of Orica Scott tactics. There’s a new Australian national criterium champion and there’s a HUGE amount of changes in the 2017 UCI Racing Calendar to discuss. There’s also some cyclocross, some Vos and some other goss to cover. It’s a big and exciting start to the new year. (1:30:25 MIN / 84.77 MB)

You can get free automated automated downloads via iTunes here or via our RSS feed here.

Things we talked about this week included…

Sarah’s posts on the 2017 women’s road calendar:

  • Part 1: How the 2016 Road Calendar changed between publication and racing – and how 2016 compares to 2017
  • Part 2: How many races we’ve lost in 2017, and how that fits into patterns over time
  • Part 3:  Where the change have happened

This week’s racing

IJsboerke Ladies Trophy #7 – GP Sven Nys, Baal

Results, photos on Cyclephotos.co.uk and the DVV Trophy website, IJsboerke Trophy Rankings with one race to go, and video highlights:

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The 2017 road cycling calendar – where have the changes happened?

I’ve been looking at the 2017 women’s road cycling calendar – in Part 1 of this series, I looked at how 2017 compares to 2016 (and how the 2016 calendar changed between) publication and racing, and in Part 2, I looked at how 2017 fits into the patterns of numbers of races over time.  Now, I’m going to look at where the changes have happened, and the implications for the women’s calendar as a whole.

So here’s how the races have changed since 2006.  I used 2006 as my base year, the first time I started this research, as it was the first full year of races logged on CQ Ranking, but it’s useful as it includes three Olympic years, and as you can see, there’s been an upward trend on most continents, but there tends to be a large increase in the Olympic year, then a reduction the following year, and a slow climb to the next Olympic year.

screen-shot-2017-01-03-at-23-41-00

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