Great articles about cycling, equality, infrastructure and more

I am always interested in the wider debates about how to get more people cycling, in the UK, because that’s where I’m based, and elsewhere.  I’m especially interested in how these are framed – my work history includes a lot of work on areas of deprivation, increasing equality and so on, so I’m especially interested in work that looks at the way issues of gender, ethnicity and diversity intersect, as well as poverty/wealth.  So I love the work of Dr Rachel Aldred, a Senior Lecturer in Transport at the University of Westminster who, among other things, has set up the Near Miss Project which is pretty self explanatory.

Her latest piece on her site is ‘Culture, Equity and Cycling Infrastructure‘, and it has so much information about how different groups using cycling in different ways, and issues that need to be tackled at all kinds of levels.  I especially appreciate the fact she places infrastructure at the heart of it all, because that chimes with my own personal experiences.  I was going to pull out some quotes out to illustrate it, but really, you should click through and read it all, it packs a lot of interconnected information in, with a really engaging mix of academic and personal background.

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Coming from a different direction is one of my favourite cycling bloggers, Lindsay Barlow, whose piece ‘Let’s talk about bike-ism: You don’t get to judge me for my Lycra‘ has a serendipitous link to Aldred’s article through the conversations about cycling stigma and infrastructure.  Lindsay talks about her frustrations at the negativity and judgement both from non-cyclists and media and from within parts of the cycling community, and I love her very personal framing.  There’s anger there, especially talking about the death of a member of her cycling community, but it’s that kind of anger that can be a catalyst for change, and that’s really important.

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Of course you can follow both of these writers on twitter at @RachelAldred and @TourdeLindsayB.  And if you, like me, are interested in women’s participation in cycling, or women and sport in general, some more things, which you have probably seen already, but they’re worth repeating:

 

 

As always, if you’ve seen more links on these topics that you’d like to share, please do tell me in the comments, or on twitter, and I’ll put up another post of them.

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A collection of posts about women and sports

I’ve had this post in draft for the last month, and every time I’ve been about to post it, I’ve seen something new.  But I should just press “publish” now – it’s a collection of things I’ve seen in the last month about women and sports, with an emphasis on cycling, of course!

There was a lot of talk about women and sports and equality recently, and my favourite was this piece by Hadley Freeman in the Guardian:  Female athletes stealing from men?  I call it equal pay.  It’s a pithy, witty, and righteously angry response to some really stupid commentary that we can’t give parity to women as it would hurt men somehow.  Click through, you won’t regret it.

Here’s a great tweet about the issue in cyclocross

And some really interesting information about the Basque campaign for equality for women’s cycling.

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While equal pay is a huge issue in women’s sports in most of the world, it’s important to me to remember that just riding a bike is a right not all women share.  So I’m always heartened by articles about the Afghan women’s cycling team, like this one in the Guardian, on how they’re aiming for the Olympics.  And there’s a great audio interview with Yara Sallam, a young Egyptian feminist and lawyer, on how women are reclaiming public spaces by riding bikes, scooters and motorbikes.  It’s by the Association for Women’s rights in Development, and it’s really inspiring.

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Women’s sports and prize money

A few short links for you today, that are kind of related.

1.  If you’re in the UK, you might have seen a lot of things on various BBC sites on the different between prize money for women and men in the same sports.  That’s partly to do with this BBC report, which does a sport-by-sport comparison (including the Para-sports, which really suffer here) – and there’s an article about it too on the BBC site.

2.  One of the places this has been talked about is on BBC Radio 4 programme Woman’s Hour, where superstar Emma Pooley was discussing the issues.  If you missed it, listen here (if it’s restricted, you might need something like Hola set to the UK)

3.  Helen Wyman‘s latest blog on Cyclingnews talks about the work she’s been doing on prize money within cyclocross, and how she worked with Twenty20 Cycles to get equal prize money for the women at Saturday’s Koppenbergcross.  Helen also talked to me recently about how since men’s cyclocross in Belgium is pretty much at saturation point, so women’s cycling is the obvious way to bring in more audience – that’s in part 1 of my interview with her, in part 2 she talks more about her work with the UCI.

Podcast 2013 Episode 25 – Good news everybody!

Podcast logoThis week Sarah and I discuss races in London and France (along with some others). Then I fail at live-ish Twitter searching and we discuss a whole bunch of ways in which you can help make the sport better. It’s good news everybody! (Also don’t forget to check all the links below, especially the things we forgot to mention in the podcast, particularly the links to live coverage of the junior track worlds!). (59:39 MIN / 57.27 MB)

Stream the world’s best podcast about women’s cycling by clicking here.

 

 

Sign up to all the future iTunes podcastery here.

Things we talked about this week:

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Why the petition for a women’s TdF is vitally important

So yesterday on the podcast Sarah and I made mention of the petition that is running now to ask the ASO to commit to a women’s TdF. The petition’s been started by several pro cyclists and Emma Pooley has given a couple of great interviews about it and what they’re trying to achieve.

If you’re still trying to decide whether you should sign the petition or not, let’s talk through some of the things that it is and isn’t for, and what it will and won’t achieve.

My take on the petition from the start has been that it’s a good thing, even though it’s unlikely to achieve all of its aims (it’s asking ASO to institute a fully-equitable women’s race in terms of distance, race days, prize money and coverage in 2014).

Without taking anything away from the ambition at all, I think it’s safe to say that any fan of women’s cycling who’s been around for more than 5 minutes knows that this just won’t happen. But as Pooley herself acknowledges, the petition is about staking out an ideal and working towards it, and this is why the petition is vitally important.

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Episode 10 – The Product is Valuable

Episode 10 – The Product is Valuable (originally posted 20 July 2012)

 

 

This week we kick things off in style with our most ebullient opening yet, before we launch into philosophical problem solving as we try to work out what exactly a sausage stand is. I discover a specific circumstance under which I’d be willing to consider gender reassignment surgery, although it’s probably not necessary and Sarah gives you more information on Thüringen Rundfahrt.

Sarah and I see things differently on this article from Outside magazine. This also leads us to talk about Stef Wyman’s article for cyclismas which addresses some of the same issues from a different point of view.

I accidentally do an impersonation of a “real Aussie” according to Sarah before working my way through a quick, sweary list of practical things we (the fans) can do to help women’s cycling. I get really, really fucking excited about Vyclone.com

And then we wrap things up by reminding ourselves that the product is valuable. (53:27MIN / 42.47MB)