Olympic videos – Rio 2016

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We’re eventually going to see all the Olympic bike races put up on the Olympics Youtube, but until then, here’s what we can watch from the Rio 2016 women’s cycling – road race, ITT, track, BMX and MTB, with various other bits and pieces I’ve found.

If you want to compare and contrast what happened in Rio with previous Olympics, head to the Olympic Channel, where you can search by sport, and under the Rio 2016 videos, you’ll find highlights from previous years too.

A lot of the Olympic media is geo-restricted to countries (INRNG tells you more about restrictions, and how to see things despite them), so if there’s more you want to see, do try searching with your country’s broadcaster – I’ve added the BBC links because I can see them all from the UK, but hopefully you can find them in your country too. If there’s anything you especially enjoyed, please do tell me, and I’ll edit it in.

Road

The Road Race

We kicked off with the Road Race, which was dramatic, in so many different ways  – Dan and I talked about it in our post-race podcast.  Highlights on the Olympic Channel, and on the Olympic YT:

Anna van der Breggen talks about it in this InCycle TV interview:

Full results, and more Road race media:

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How to watch the 2016 women’s Olympic cycling, live

Screen Shot 2016-08-06 at 22.09.44Are you as excited as I am?  It’s Rio 2016, the Olympic Games, and it’s full of women’s cycling!

Here’s the timings for the races.  Rio is in the BRST timezone, 4 hours behind UK BST, 5 hours behind Euro CEST, 13 hours behind Aussie AEST (ouch) and 1 hour ahead of North American EDT

Women’s Road Race, Sunday 7th August – 1:15-4:20ish BRST (starts 5:15pm BST, 18:15 CEST, 2:15am AEST, 12:15pm EDT).  There’s a preview on Ella Cycling Tips, and the startlist will be here on the day, or use CyclingFever’s.

Women’s Individual Time Trial, Wednesday 10th August – 8:30am BRST (starts 12:30pm BST, 13:30 CEST, 5:30pm AEST, 7:30am EDT).  SO SORRY, THE TIME I PUT U BEFORE HAS CHANGED!  This is right now! The startlist will be here on the day, and hopefully we’ll see split times there too.  More startlist options on CyclingFever, or on my twitter.

If you can’t watch, or want commentary on the road races, follow #CyclingRoad on twitter.

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Track, 11th-16th August – startlists will be via that link – the #CyclingTrack hashtag is how to follow on twitter.

  • Thursday 11th:  Session from 4pm BRST (8pm BST, 21:00 CEST, 3pm EDT, 4am AEST) – the women’s race in this session is the Women’s Team Pursuit Qualifying, from 4:19-5:10pm BRST
  • Friday 12th:  Session from 4pm BRST (8pm BST, 21:00 CEST, 3pm EDT, 4am AEST), and the women’s racing is the Team Sprint, with the Qualifying and Round 1, and the Finals from 6pm BRST (10pm BST, 23:00 CEST, 5pm EDT and 7am Sat AEST)
  • Saturday 13th:  Morning Session from 10am BRST (2pm BST, 15:00 CEST, 9am EDT, 11pm AEST) and Evening Session from 4pm BRST (8pm BST, 21:00 CEST, 3pm EDT, 4am AEST)

The women’s races  the Women’s Team Pursuit Qualifying, from 4:19-5:10pm BRSTand the women’s race is the Keirin – finals from 5:27pm BRST (9:27pm BST, 22:27 CEST, 4:27 EDT and 6:27am Sunday AEST)

  • Sunday 14th:  Morning Session from 4pm BRST (8pm BST, 21:00 CEST, 3pm EDT, 4am AEST) – includes Women’s Sprint qualifying and 1/16 finals, and Team Pursuit Round 1, and the Finals at 4:53pm BRST (8:53pm BST, 21:53 CEST, 3:53pm EDT, 5:53am Monday AEST)
  • Monday 15th:  Morning Session from 10am BRST (2pm BST, 15:00 CEST, 9am EDT, 11pm AEST) and Evening Session from 4pm BRST (8pm BST, 21:00 CEST, 3pm EDT, 4am AEST)

Includes women’s sprint racing and the first three omnium rounds.  Omnium scratch from 11am BRST (3pm BST, 16:00 CEST, 10am EDT, midnight AEST) and my favourite round of the Omnium, the Elimination from 6:17 BRST (10:17pm BST, 23:17 CEST, 5:17pm EDT and 7:17am Tuesday AEST)

  • Tuesday 16th:  Morning Session from 10am BRST (2pm BST, 15:00 CEST, 9am EDT, 11pm AEST) and Evening Session from 4pm BRST (8pm BST, 21:00 CEST, 3pm EDT, 4am AEST)

Includes the end of the women’s sprint and omnium.   Omnium final round, the Points race, from 5pm BRST (9pm BST, 22:00 CEST, 4pm EDT, 6am Weds AEST) and the Sprint finals from 5:45 BRST.

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Women’s BMX – course preview here, startlists will be here – follow the #CyclingBMX hashtag on twitter

  • Seeding Run, Wednesday 17th August, 1:30-2pm BRST (from 5:30pm BST, 18:30 CEST, 12:30pm EDT, 2:30am AEST)
  • Main event Friday 18th August – session starts with the Women’s semi-finals 1:30-2pm BRST (from 5:30pm BST, 18:30 CEST, 12:30pm EDT, 2:30am AEST) and women’s finals from 3pm BRST (7pm BST, 20:00 CEST, 2pm EDT, 4am Saturday AEST)

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Cross Country MTB, Saturday 20th August, 12:30-3:15pm BRST (from 5:30 BST, 18:30 CEST, 11:30am EDT, 2:30am AEST) Startlists will be here. #CyclingMountainBike is the clumsy twitter hashtag.

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I’m watching these on the BBC (they have special Olympic TV channels, which you can find here, and there’ll be web feeds from this page) but if you don’t have good TV in your country, you should be able to find streams on streaming sites like this, this and this.   And if you want to use a VPN solution to your favourite country’s streaming, INRNG explains more here.

If you have any questions – and the sport, especially if you’re new to the women’s racing, ask in the comments, or on twitter, and I’ll try to help.  Of course, I’ll pull together videos, after the events

Dan and I podcast-previewed the Road Race, and you can listen to that here.

Guest blog: Peter van der Veen’s Olympic qualification update

Back in November, Peter van der Veen, one of the best women’s cycling twitterers, and stalwart of Cycling Fever, explained the qualification system for the women’s road cycling in Rio 2016.  Here he updates the situation…

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Today the qualification period for the women’s Rio Olympics road race ended, and everyone has been very curious about which countries gets to go and how many and which riders they will take. After my blog in late fall, I had a lot of fans, riders and even national coaches asking me for updates on the standings. This was because the rules are quite complex and the UCI was not very keen on providing regular updates. Below I will try to explain the rules of allocating the 67 places in the Olympic women’s road race and 25 places in the time trail. But first:

It is very important to know that I did this as a fan and so this is not close to official. Most of it was done by hand and it is possible that there are some errors in the standings. Also it is very likely a nation will turn down a spot and the UCI interprets the rules for reallocation differently than I have.

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Which 2016 women’s road races can we watch live?

2016 is shaping up to be a really exciting year for women’s road cycling.  It’s only February, and we’ve already had 2 stage races streamed live, the Tour Femenino de San Luis and the Ladies Tour of Qatar, and the season hasn’t really started yet.  The first ever Women’s WorldTour promises us more racing footage than ever, and Belgian TV station Sporza will be showing part of the Ronde van Vlaanderen live, in a move I hope will have a knock-on effect on other broadcasters.  Of course an Olympic year always gives us extra, but it looks like the last two summers, with live races every week for around 6 weeks, was just the beginning.  So it feels like a good time for a guide to what we might be able to watch live, and what has significant highlights of at least 30 minutes.  I’ll come back to MTB later in the year, so this is just road.

Of course, a caveat before we start.  This is basically guesses, based on what we’ve seen in previous years, so please don’t take it as set in stone, as it might not be accurate.   And of course, more might be added!   I’m focusing on road races, but I’ll put a guide to Crits in the USA and UK below – and you can find my tried-and-tested ways of staying in touch with races that aren’t being shown over here.

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How the women’s 2016 road cycling calendar has changed since October

A recent tradition in women’s road cycling has been for the UCI to announce the women’s road calendar  for the following year around the Road World Championships…. and then add and take away and move races throughout the entire year, so the calendar is never actually confirmed until after everything’s been raced.  It’s frustrating, for teams, riders, media and fans – and for other races, when they think they’ve got a great empty spot on the calendar, and suddenly 2 more races clash with it.  So I thought I’d have a look at how it might have changed since I last looked at the 2016 calendar, back in October, when I wrote a mini series (how the 2015 calendar changed between being published and raced; a first look at the 2016 season; changes to the calendar over time, and the podcast where Dan and I talked about all this).  I was expecting changes, but not THIS many changes, and I’ll tell you about them below, why it matters, why it might have happened, and what extra changes are in the pipeline.

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A collection of posts about women and sports

I’ve had this post in draft for the last month, and every time I’ve been about to post it, I’ve seen something new.  But I should just press “publish” now – it’s a collection of things I’ve seen in the last month about women and sports, with an emphasis on cycling, of course!

There was a lot of talk about women and sports and equality recently, and my favourite was this piece by Hadley Freeman in the Guardian:  Female athletes stealing from men?  I call it equal pay.  It’s a pithy, witty, and righteously angry response to some really stupid commentary that we can’t give parity to women as it would hurt men somehow.  Click through, you won’t regret it.

Here’s a great tweet about the issue in cyclocross

And some really interesting information about the Basque campaign for equality for women’s cycling.

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While equal pay is a huge issue in women’s sports in most of the world, it’s important to me to remember that just riding a bike is a right not all women share.  So I’m always heartened by articles about the Afghan women’s cycling team, like this one in the Guardian, on how they’re aiming for the Olympics.  And there’s a great audio interview with Yara Sallam, a young Egyptian feminist and lawyer, on how women are reclaiming public spaces by riding bikes, scooters and motorbikes.  It’s by the Association for Women’s rights in Development, and it’s really inspiring.

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Questions I’d like the UCI presidential candidates to answer

We heard yesterday that Brian Cookson, the president of British Cycling, has decided to stand against Pat McQuaid as the present of the UCI (the International Cycling Union).  There are a lot of people saying that we should support Cookson on the anyone-but-McQuaid card, and there is a point to that – but Cookson isn’t exactly an uncontroversial character without conflict of interest – the deep and inseparable links between British Cycling and Team Sky are problematic as they are, without adding the UCI into the mix. Of course, McQuaid has actual allegations of corruption against him (around the Lance Armstrong doping issues, for example), and Cookson doesn’t, and the McQuaid presidency has been dogged with issues on many levels, but it’s not as simple as Cookson as a knight in shining armour coming to rescue the sport.

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