Rose Manley tells the secrets of cycling TV highlights

It’s the Giro Rosa this week, ten days of grueling racing in Italy, the biggest women’s stage race in the world, and one of the best ways to keep up with the action is the daily highlights videos on the UCI YouTube.

These are part of their commitment to supporting the Women’s WorldTour, and this year, they’re made by Rose Manley, of InCycle TV.  I’ve always enjoyed Rose’s work, so I was delighted when she came on the podcast and told me all about the effort that goes into producing these, and the features she’s been making on various riders throughout the season.

It’s a hard job, for sure, but one that’s so valuable, and I loved her walking through what her (VERY long) day at a race is like, and the highs and lows of working on the WorldTour this season.  Here’s hoping she’s able to get some sleep in Italy!

Listen here, or download from Soundcloud.

 

You can sign up for automatic podcast downloads via the iTunes store here or via our RSS feed here.

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You can find all of Rose’s 2017 WorldTour highlights and features on the UCI YouTube, and more  within the InCycle TV programmes.  Make sure you’re watching the Giro Rosa features every day!

Rose is also on twitter and instagram, and I recommend you follow her there too.

We talked about three specific features that were highlights of Rose’s 2017 so far – the profiles of Kasia Niewiadoma before Strade Bianche, Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio talking about her recovery from her horrible accident, and hanging out with Coryn Rivera at home in California:

Big thanks to my amazing Patreon supporters, who fund me to do this kind of work.  You can join them over here for as little as 2 £/$/€ a month.

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On pitchforks, patience, demand, and the Tour Down Under

We’re at the first stage race of 2017, the Santos Women’s Tour, and it’s time for the first women’s cycling polemica of the season.  It’s a familiar cry, “why can’t we see more of the racing?”, with a lot of people going further, with “why can’t we watch live?”, and the familiar response that seems to chide fans for wanting more.  I have feelings about this, as you can imagine.

Let’s start with some background.  The Santos Women’s Tour (SWT) is a four-stage race alongside the men’s Tour Down Under – two crits, and two road races (one under 80km long).  It’s the first UCI road race of 2017, and has a great field that have been Down Under for winter sunshine, training camps, non-UCI races like the Mitchelton Bay Cycling Classic and the Aussie Road Nationals, as well as the UCI-ranked Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race on 28th January.  It’s always exciting, seeing the teams in their new iterations (and new kits), and with the loss of the Tour de San Luís and the Ladies Tour of Qatar, the status has risen.

Now, although it’s nominally part of the Tour Down Under, they have different race organisers, though the sponsor, website and social media present them as two sides of the same coin – and the races are both owned by South Australian Government, which has used the Santos Women’s Tour as evidence of their commitment to promote women’s sport.  So it’s a surprise to see the men’s and women’s races treated differently.  The Pre-TDU People’s Choice Classic, the men’s crit that’s on the same course and day as the SWT Stage 2 Crit, for example, was streamed live, with two highlights videos on the Tour Down Under YouTube (one 4:21 long, and the 1:19 finish video), plus a “fan cam”, and 1:57 long winner’s interview, while at this point there’s only a 1:47 long video covering Stages 1 & 2 of the women’s race combined.  For context, compare that to the 1:34 video of the Undies Run at the race.

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Talking television with Helen Wyman

Podcast interview logoThe 2016 Aviva Women’s Tour was a fantastic race, and Dan and I talked about the racing action in our latest podcast (spoiler alert: so exciting!) – but I had a pretty unique view of the race this year, because I was doing commentary for ITV4.  I was doing the “as live” commentary with Hugh Porter, while cyclocross superstar and general all-round cycling guru Helen Wyman did the presenting at the start and finish of each show with Ned Boulting.  I had so many questions about her experience – so we chatted about it all, with a foray at the end into how the TV coverage of women’s cyclocross has already changed the sport after one season – have a listen!

 

 

If you missed any of our TV commentary, they’ll be archived for a few more weeks here on the ITV Hub.  You can also find tons of clips from the race, including highlights with some of me, on the Aviva Women’s Tour YouTube – and of course more fantastic media on the race website.

Find out more about Helen on her website and by following her great twitter, and check out her fantastic cycling kit collaboration with Velocio Apparel, for women and for men…

As always, I am funded to do this kind of thing by my wonderful Patreon supporters – thank you so much!  You can join them from as little as £/$/€ 2 a month, over here.

The 2016 Women’s World Tour – media scorecard 1

This is going to be part of an ongoing series, looking at the media about the Women’s Road Cycling World Tour.  I’ll talk about the actual racing in other posts, and especially in the weekly women’s cycling podcasts, but I want to spend some time looking at how the series lives up to the promises the UCI have made about it.  And now the dust has settled on the first round of the series, the Strade Bianche, I want to look at how the World Tour compares to the Road World Cup.

Let’s start with what was promised.  The World Tour is a brand new initiative for 2016, an evolution of the women’s Road World Cup, going from 10 day races in 2015, to 17 races with 35 racing days this year.  It’s been much hyped this year, for example, in last week’s press release about the series, we had quotes from UCI President Brian Cookson:  “It will provide the perfect platform not just to grow women’s cycling around the world, but also to boost the profile of women’s cycling“, and Vice-President Tracey Gaudry: “Teams, riders and event organisers are all on-board, and fans will now be able to see the best female cyclists all around the world.”  It promises:

“All 17 events of the 2016 UCI Women’s WorldTour will benefit from TV coverage, either from live broadcast, live streaming or same day highlights packages.

In addition, the UCI will partner exclusively with IMG to ensure extra-exposure for the UCI Women’s WorldTour through the InCycle magazine show, which has generated a global audience of 18.68 million from 1,358 hours of broadcast coverage in 2015. Throughout the season, 12 shows of 26 minutes will each feature a sequence dedicated to the UCI Women’s WorldTour. This exclusive content will be accessible via http://www.incycle.tv and http://tv.uci.ch (without geo restrictions) and through the +35 broadcasters the magazine is distributed to on all continents.”

The trouble is, what we’ve seen from the first round, and what seems to be coming up for future races doesn’t match these promises.

Less coverage from the World Tour than for the World Cups

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Sarah interviews… Anne-Marije Rook

Podcast interview logoThis year following women’s cycling has got easier and more fun with the launch of Ella, the Cycling Tips women’s cycling site. Anne-Marije Rook is one of their two editors, Dutch journalist who races and rides around her home in Seattle.

We talked about how she got involved with the site, how it’s grown, challenges and goals, and of course her plans for the future.  Of course our conversation took in a lot more, including the state of women’s cycling and what we love about it, and all kinds of things about the sport.

 

You can get free automated updates via the iTunes store here or via our RSS feed here.

Ella Cycling Tips is online here, and you can follow their twitter too – and find out more about Anne-Marije on her website, twitter and instagram.

Podcast 2014 Episode 55 – Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics

Podcast logoIt’s time to talk cycling survey results! So that’s what we do this week, breaking down the basic demographics of our respondents and highlighting the sections that we each found most interesting. There’s lies, damned lies and most importantly, statistics (and of course plenty of jokes and swearing to go along with it)! (55:14 MIN / 53.03 MB)

To stream the most statistically valid podcast available on this page, click here.

 

Or sign up for automated updates from the iTunes store OR via our RSS feed here.

We were talking about the women’s cycling audience survey we ran in September – and we’ll be starting a series of mini-posts talking about things we’re interested in over the next month or so – and then an overarching collation post at the end.

Huge thanks, as ever, to everyone who shared the survey, completed it themselves, posted about it, and everything else.  We really appreciate your support – and if you have any specific questions about it, please do let us know, on twitter (Sarah is @_pigeons_, Dan is @danwofficial), in the comments, or at prowomenscycling [at] gmail [dot] come

Why does the UCI get away with treating women’s cycling so badly?

This week has been frustrating for women’s cycling.  There have been three big stories that demonstrate the difficulties the sport is in – but you’d never know that, from looking at the cycling media

Last Sunday was the Tour of ChongMing Island World Cup, where the result was decided not by great racing, but by a human error, when the last corner wasn’t marked, taking the peloton off course in the last kilometres and allowing an opportunistic attacker, Tetyana Riabchenko, to win solo.  Reports differ as to exactly what happened (here’s the ORICA-AIS report) everyone describes it as an unfortunate mistake by an otherwise excellent race organiser, and of course the peloton may not have caught Riabchenko – but it’s incredibly frustrating that one of the rounds of the World Cup, one of the most prestigious competitions of the year, ends this way.

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