Podcast 2017 Episode 8 – Won By Sprinters Doing Sprinty Things in a Sprint

This week we revisit all of the excitement from the Women’s World Tour at the Ronde van Drenthe. There’s more great racing from Drentse 8 and Setmarna Ciclista Valenciana. On top of this we have several really good articles about ways to improve women’s cycling to discuss and there’s been some interesting news in regards to British Cycling, and Jeannie Longo’s husband Patrice Ciprelli. Of course we can’t finish on a downer so we also take note of some of the fun stuff we’ve seen around the web this week. As always, heaps of links and videos in the post on the website!

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News and videos from the last week in women’s cycling

This week’s racing

Videos, photos and more from the excellent Ronde van Drenthe in this post here.

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Drentse Acht van Westerveld

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Podcast 2016, Episode 14 – It’s OK, he’s an Aussie

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G’day from sunny Manchester this week team! Dan’s on holiday and enjoying the snow in the English spring. This week we’ve got heaps to talk about and it’s not all scandals involving Australians in Manchester. We also talk the end of the Assos Girl, the penalties for motor doping, crowd-funding and that big Marianne Vos crash.

On top of that, there’s heaps of racing to cover off. We’ve got Joe Martin Stage Race in the US, Omloop van Borsele, Dwars door Westhoek, and heaps of Cairns MTB activity. Of course there’s the usual hilarity and this week an added bonus of technical difficulties (which we’ve done our absolute best to correct, but sorry/not sorry).

Before you do anything else, make sure you vote for all the great cycling-related entries in the 2016 #BeAGameChanger awards – voting closes on 1st May, so hurry!

Things we talked about included….

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An incomplete list of British Cycling’s issues with women riders

This week there’s been tons in the news about British Cycling and discrimination, particularly relating to allegations of sexism, saying a rider’s too old to race at 25, and most recently, discrimination against para-cyclists.  This started when British Cycling talked to the Telegraph about dropping sprinter Jess Varnish from the programme – which wasn’t a surprise, as she had voiced her frustrations about how BC had handled the Team Sprint, when GB failed to qualify at the 2016 Track World Championships.  Varnish’s issue then was the choices BC had made about the teams they put into races for the Olympic Qualifying period, and so BC’s sacking her was expected at the time.

She then responded, and what was surprising is that she’s alleged to have been told to “go off and have a baby”, and that at 25 she’s too old to improve.  It was followed by British Cycling’s Performance Director, Shane Sutton, denying that in the media – and some great pieces by former Olympic and World Champions Nicole Cooke and Victoria Pendleton speaking out in defense of Varnish, Varnish’s official statement, and an interview talking about a ‘culture of fear‘ at BC, an interesting comment from Lizzie Armitstead, a piece on the MTB issues from Jenny Copnall and then (Daily Mail link) Para-cyclist Darren Kenny and “multiple sources” talking about offensive language and behaviour towards Para-cyclists – which lead to Sutton’s suspension, and then resignation.

Update! Olympic Champion Rebecca Romero also talked about the toxic velodrome atmosphere

So that’s this week! But this is very much part of a pattern.  While big name men like Bradley Wiggins have come out defending Sutton, and track superstar Laura Trott doing the same, this is part of a LONG pattern of top-name women talking about their bad experiences with British Cycling and their approach to women’s cycling (whether they use the word “sexism” or not), and Shane Sutton.

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Sarah interviews… Stefan Wyman answers your questions

Podcast interview logoStefan Wyman has been around women’s cycling for years, managing his road team, Matrix Procycling, and in his role as Helen Wyman’s mechanic, soigneur and more in her cyclocross career.

Stef always has lots of opinions, so we took to twitter to give everyone the chance to ask him some questions…  which resulted in some really fun, and some quite tricky questions – I had a great time asking them all, thank you to everyone who contributed.

It’s a long interview, covering things like the state of women’s racing in the UK, why the team’s no longer UCI-ranked, how British women can get into racing and develop bike skills, Laura Trott, how we as fans can help the sport, and a lot more.

Listen to it here, or download it directly from Soundcloud.

 

You can get automated free updates for all my women’s cycling podcasts and interviews via the iTunes store (leave us a review too!) or via our RSS feed.

Follow Stefan on his twitter, and make sure you’re following Matrix Procycling on their website, twitter, facebook and instagram.  Stef, Steven Fry of M2 Sports Management recently took part in a Velocast round-table on the UCI Women’s World Tour, and you can listen to that here.

The British Cycling calendar starts here, and you need to filter it for road, women etc, and the British Cycling’s Women’s Road Series page is here. Stef says that the best thing women’s cycling fans can do is go to races and cheer, if you’re in the UK, check out what’s happening near you.  Stef’s recommendations of great races to go to include:

I’m funded to do these interviews, and most of my women’s cycling work, by my wonderful Patreon supporters.  If you’d like to join them, from as little as £1.50 a month, there’s more information here.

Podcast 2014 Episode 18 – Women on Tour

Podcast logoHi everyone! After Sarah’s leave of absence to go be awesome with the Friend’s Life Women’s Tour she reunites with Dan to relive all the drama and triumph of an amazing race. We go over all of the events of every stage and discuss what this might mean for the future of women’s racing. In the face of crowds comparable to those last seen at the Olympic Games, and media coverage from the major news outlets, not just the cycling press, look how far women’s cycling has come in the two years since we started talking shit on the internet! (Not that we’re claiming credit, but two years ago we didn’t have this podcast and we didn’t have the Friends Life Women’s Tour either… draw your own conclusions). We also squeeze in some time to talk quickly about Chongming Island and the Tour of California and take a quick look ahead at the racing coming up. It’s a big episode but it’s well worth the investment. Don’t forget to check the links below because they’ll lead you to that rarest of all treats in women’s cycling… comprehensive video coverage! (1:20:28 MIN / 72.25 MB)

Stream the Friends Life-est podcast ever by clicking here!

 

 

Or subscribe for free in the iTunes store and/or subscribe for free via our RSS feed.

Awesome links guaranteed to bring joy, happiness and fulfillment into your life!*

For ALL the must-see videos of the Friends Life Women’s Tour check out Sarahs comprehensive post over at Podium Cafe (seriously there’s literally hours of video there).

And for the collection of Sarah’s audio interviews while she was on tour, check out this great post.

*not an actual guarantee

Cycling and the unspoken

Anyone who’s been a cycling fan for more than five minutes has had to confront the doping question, explaining to friends & family why we still follow the sport, explaining Lance Armstrong, looking at Tour de France performances and questioning them even when it’s riders we love.  But sometimes I think the doping question is used as an excuse to hide every other issue.  There’s a feeling out there in the media and some fans, that once we conquer doping, cycling will be sorted.  As a women’s cycling fan, of course I know that’s not the case, but there’s a whole range of things that aren’t talked about in the media or on fansites – or at least publicly – and that make me angry.  I love this sport, so much, but there are so many issues that worry me, enrage me, and make me feel helpless, because how can fans change things?