Why is the 2017 such an unusual year for women’s road cycling? Part 2 – more unique circumstances

I’m currently writing a mini-series about why 2017 is such an unusual year for women’s road cycling, and why it’s the first year of a new chapter for the sport – whether that turns out to be be positive or negative.  Yesterday I talked about how the 2017 Classics season is really different to 2016 and the previous years.  And I also talked about how calendar has changed, including the increase in race distances, and in Classics races, and how we’ve gone from just four World Cup Classics in eight weeks, two years ago, to eight in eight weeks.

But while the 2017 Classics have been less…. attacking… than in previous years, with surprise wins by sprinters, and a lack of early attacks in some of the races we’d expect to see more early action, it’s not as simple as saying it’s because of the longer races, and more full calendar (though I’m sure that is making a difference), because there are a few more unique circumstances that are impacting on 2017, and I want to talk about some of those.

The weather

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The women’s road cycling calendar: why is 2017 such an unusual year?

2017 has been a fascinating year already for women’s cycling, and we’re only in April.  We’re about to head into Ardennes Week, which signals the end of the Spring Classics, and already the season has been completely different to previous years.

It really feels like this is the first year of a new chapter for the sport, where the women’s Classics have fallen in line with the men’s, and the old patterns – where one or two riders could dominate the entire Classics season – are over.  I’m going to talk about why the changes have happened, and have a bit of context, because while there is a lot to celebrate, it raises a lot of questions about the future of women’s cycling, and how races and teams will adapt to the new Spring.

So what has happened so far?

After the racing year opened in Australia, the season had some major changes, with the loss of two pre-European-season stage races, the Ladies Tour of Qatar and the Vuelta a San Luis in Argentina.  Qatar, especially, had been the first chance to see a lot of the new-season versions of teams, and a chance for staff and riders to spot any issues and iron them out, and for fans to make guesses about how the Classics could pan out.  Without them, the first time we saw a lot of teams was Omloop het Nieuwsblad at the end of February.

The first thing to say about how the season has gone it to compare to last year.  These are the 2017 winners, and I’m going to get a bit geeky for a moment

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Which women’s road races will be live in 2017?

I am genuinely so excited about how much more professional women’s cycling we can see these days, and how relatively fast the changes have been.  We’ve been able to watch the full women’s BMX World Cups, from qualifying up to finals, on BMX Live TV for a while now. And the full Cross Country MTB and the top Downhill finals in the Shimano MTB World Cups have been streamed on Red Bull TV for years too.  Tissot Track World Cups in the UK are shown live on TV, with a version for people who might know less about the sport on the main TV and fan-version on the Red Button, and the UCI have shown a mix of the final World Cup session live and replays of previous sessions on the UCI YouTube for a long time.  And this season, cyclocross stepped up to become easily the most visible of all the women’s cycling disciplines.

Apart from the occasional Dutch race, the UCI really started the ball rolling in CX, showing all the women’s Telenet Cyclocross World Cups on their YouTube for a few years, now – and last year Sporza showed all the IJsboerke Ladies Trophy races from the DVV Trophee, the Soudal Classics and more races, and licensed them to TV in the UK and USA, while some smaller series and USA races streamed theirs live.  Finally, for the 2016/7 season, the SuperPrestige series was shown on Belgian TV too, meaning that every major, and a whole swathe of minor races were all live.  It’s glorious!

Of course, road cycling is the hardest discipline to broadcast, logistically speaking, so it’s not surprising we get to see less of the women’s racing.  And this year it’s an unfortunate coincidence that three of the races that have been streamed live have been cancelled – the Tour Femenino de San Luis, Ladies Tour of Qatar, and the WorldTour race, the Philadelphia Classic.

But on the other hand, last year we saw a significant amount more of the racing live than ever before, and it’s got to the stage where over the summer, I can count on having being able to watch live women’s road racing on 6 consecutive weekends.  This year we’ve already had three women’s races broadcast completely live for the first time – the Mitchelton Bay Crits (videos in here), and the women’s races at the Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race, the Race Melbourne crit and the Deakin Women’s Race (videos in here), and I’m confident that we’ll continue to see more and more women’s races shown over the next few years.

So here’s my guide to which women’s road races I think we’ll be able to see live in 2017.

Of course, I’ll start with a caveat:  these are guesses, based on what we’ve seen in previous years, so please don’t take it as set in stone, as I can’t promise they’ll all be shown. And of course, more might be added, and if they are, I’ll edit them in throughout the year. I’m focusing on road races, but I’ll put a guide to Crits in the USA and UK below – and you can find my tried-and-tested ways of staying in touch with races that aren’t being shown over here.

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The 2017 road cycling calendar – where have the changes happened?

I’ve been looking at the 2017 women’s road cycling calendar – in Part 1 of this series, I looked at how 2017 compares to 2016 (and how the 2016 calendar changed between) publication and racing, and in Part 2, I looked at how 2017 fits into the patterns of numbers of races over time.  Now, I’m going to look at where the changes have happened, and the implications for the women’s calendar as a whole.

So here’s how the races have changed since 2006.  I used 2006 as my base year, the first time I started this research, as it was the first full year of races logged on CQ Ranking, but it’s useful as it includes three Olympic years, and as you can see, there’s been an upward trend on most continents, but there tends to be a large increase in the Olympic year, then a reduction the following year, and a slow climb to the next Olympic year.

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The loss of women’s road races in 2017 – and patterns since 2006

I am in the middle of having a look at the UCI women’s road calendar for 2017, and one of the things I like to do is to look at each year in the context of recent history.  I think it’s important to see what the trends are, and what things mean for the calendar.  In Part 1 of this year’s work, I looked at the chaos of the 2016 road calendar, and how many changes there were between the calendar being published in October 2016, and what was actually raced. As well as that, I looked at how the 2017 is different to 2016. – and this time I’m going to put that in the context of research I’ve already done.

I started this in 2011, and took 2006 as my “base” year, because that’s when CQ Ranking started their comprehensive records, and it seemed as good a place as any.  This gives us patterns to look at – and I have to say, at first glance, the numbers are depressing.  Here’s how the number of women’s road races in 2017 compares to previous years:

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But within cycling, it’s not just about the number of races, because that can be misleading:  the Giro Rosa, 10 days long, provides more racing than 6 days races, for example.  So I also look at this in terms of racing days:

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Looking back at the 2016 Road Cycling Calendar – and ahead to 2017

For the last six years, on and off, I’ve been doing some research and analysis of the women’s cycling road calendar.  I started this in the first place because I wanted to really understand the impact of losing and gaining races because I hadn’t seen it anywhere else; and because I work visually, I ended up with lots of colour-coordinated charts and spreadsheets.  You can find the earlier posts in the Podium Café series, and then the posts from last year under the women’s road calendar tag on this website.

Now, I usually do this when the UCI announces the coming year’s calendar, around the Road World Champs, but this year, I couldn’t face it, and saved it up until a newsworthy time – which turned out to be a good move. The thing that stopped me doing it  is that it changes so much in the months between the announcement and when the races actually take place.

We see this every year – new races that are announced that never run (I’m thinking of the Syrian races, which were included in the calendar for years, even though the war made it perfectly clear they’d never happen, as the most egregious examples, but every year there are more), ones that move around the calendar between initial announcement, and the “pop-up” races that are given UCI status so late in the year that of course most big teams, who have to set their racing schedules in the summer, can’t get there.  If you want examples, check out my posts about the 2016 season:  the initial announcement in October, changes between October and December, and then more changes by February.

And now it’s time for my annual look at the difference between was was initially on the calendar for 2016, and what was actually raced – and then I’ll look ahead to what we know about 2016.  Prepare for the colour coding!

How did the 2016 calendar change between original publication and racing?

To have a closer look, click on each image, or you can open the PDF version.

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Guest post: Peter van der Veen: Amstel Gold Race for women, fantastic! Or not so?

Peter van der Veen is one of my favourite commentators on women’s cycling – you should all be following him on twitter, and be checking into Cycling Fever for excellent stats and information about women’s racing.

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On Monday 3rd October the organisation behind the Amstel Gold Race (AGR) announced a women’s race on the same day as the men and most likely it will also be included in the Women’s World Tour. Raced on the same day as the men’s race, it will no doubt be a great addition to the WWT with its challenging hilly course. Big crowds and with many media already there, it can be expected to get a lot of attention including TV coverage. It sounds like a success story, but if one looks beyond the actual race, one might see a downside to the story.

But first an introduction to the race. The race is not completely new, not only has there been 3 editions in 2001, 2002, 2003. There is also a race in May called the Boels Rental Hills Classic which is in the same area although it has not the same parcours.

Over the past years, a lot of people have lobbied for a women AGR, reasoning was that while the Dutch riders dominated the women’s cycling, they did not have a real platform to show their skills.  As the Amstel Gold Race is considered the 6th Monument and the pinnacle of Dutch cycling, it draws a lot of media attention. However race organiser Leo van Vliet always made excuses not to have the race.
The most used excuses were logistics: it is difficult to have the same on the same day as the course uses a lot of climbs the same time; and economically, not profitable.

When asked by cyclist Marijn de Vries why there was no women AGR in 2015 Van Vliet replied women could race the sportive on Saturday implying that female cyclist were all amateurs.

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