Talking Cyclocross with Adam Myerson

Podcast interview logoAdam Myerson is one of my favourite personalities in cyclocross.  He’s recently retired from being a pro cyclocross and road racer, has been running CX races in the USA for over 25 years, and has a fantastic online presence as a cyclocross analyst.

We talked about the 2015-6 European season, the state of USA CX (and why referring to it as a single scene is a misnomer), how the sport has changed, and everything from “Why can’t Sanne smile?” to Femke van den Driessche’s motorised bike at the 2016 CX Worlds, with a focus on the women but talking a lot about the men’s side of the sport as well.  And we’re joined by Myerson’s baby son Flynn, leading to a conversation about Adam’s new life as a stay-at-home dad, as well as the book he’s writing.

Listen to the ‘cast here, or click through to Soundcloud to download it.

You can get automated free updates for all my women’s cycling podcasts and interviews via the iTunes store (leave us a review too!) or via our RSS feed. (Please note, this is a new RSS, so long-time listeners may need to re-subscribe).

To find out more about Adam, follow him on twitter, instagram and facebook.  Adam started a cycling coaching company, Cycle-Smart, and you can find out all about them on the company website, and about him specifically, on his coach’s page.

Adam’s been organising the Cycle-Smart Northampton International Cyclocross race, the oldest UCI CX race in the USA, since he was 19 and also runs the Vittoria North East Series of races in New England – click through and check them out, and follow the race series twitter.

I’ve collected videos from the women’s races at the 2016 Cyclocross World Championships, and if you want more videos and interviews from the 2015/6 CX season, check out the Cyclocross section of the website.

I’m funded to do these interviews thanks to my wonderful Patreon supporters – thank you so much!  If you want to join them from just £1.50/$2 a month, there’s more information here.

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North Star Grand Prix – 2015 and beyond

So, you may remember that a few weeks ago Sarah and I mentioned on the podcast the interesting story of Carmen Small racing with the men at the North Star Grand Prix this year. We thought it was an interesting story, particularly in terms of the race not being able to find enough women to ride this year and a creative solution to an unusual set of circumstances.

I thought it’d be interesting to get in touch with the race organisers to find out a little more about how this all came together and what it means for future editions of the North Star Grand Prix. Thanks to our mate Chris Rivera (who’s a big advocate for women’s cycling and a volunteer at the North Star Grand Prix himself) I was able to get in touch with David LaPorte, the Executive Director of the North Star Bicycle Festival and Promoter of the North Star Grand Prix to ask him a few questions.

ProWomen’sCycling: There’s been a fair bit of attention on the North Star Grand Prix and particularly on the fact that Carmen Small raced with the men. This is a marked difference to previous years when there was a separate women’s event. How has the response been so far?

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Happy New Year!

New Year’s Eve is that traditional time to look back at the year, and make plots and plans for the future – and in blogging terms, it’s always fun to remind myself what I’ve done.  So, some highlights from the blog, and things you may have missed from 2014.  I know it’s a bit self-indulgent, but hell, that’s what this time of year is for!

My most viewed posts of 2014

Unsurprisingly, the top 5 most-read posts were guides on how to watch live racing – in order, starting with the most views, how to watch La Course, the 2014 Cyclocross World Championships, the Friends Life Women’s Tour, the Commonwealth Games cycling and the Giro Rosa.  I put all my guides to watching racing in real life in my Live cycling section.  And if you, like me, are excited about the #WT2015, here’s their first video of the year:

The actual 4th place goes to a post I didn’t even write this year, but people keep finding (possibly through some of the more bizarre search terms):

How not to try to sell cycling clothing to women – and three companies who get it right

Number 6 on the list was another rant/rage-post: I am so sick of reading these stories, all about the frustration of reading  this article on La Bicicleta México, alleging Mexican riders on Estado de México-Faren weren’t paid, but to add insult to injury, also faced discrimination within the team and unacceptable treatment from team staff.  My heart-felt hope is that the UCI works out a process to support riders in 2015, so these stories become a thing of the past.

After that?  Shopping posts – lots of shopping posts!  Check out the Shopping section for gift guides, where you can buy team kit, cycling clothing for women who are XL and above, and a lot more – just check out the date they were written on, because some of the links are broken.

My own favourite thing I wrote in 2014

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Women’s cycling audience survey part 2 – what do people follow, and why do they like it?

This is part 2 of a series of mini-posts looking at the women’s cycling audience survey Dan and I ran back in September.  Part 1 was about what we did and why, and who responded – this post will look at what cycling people watch.

Now, I said in part 1, we ran this over Road Worlds, so the responses will skew to road – we probably would have got different responses if we were running it over MTB or CX World Championships.  But even so, there wasn’t as much pro road dominance as I’d thought we’d get.

What do people follow?

What do they followThis question was answered by 1,632 people.  It was asked in a checklist, and people could pick as many varieties as they wanted – so the percentages are of the number of respondents.  The list going down to cyclocross was included in a drop-down menu, and then there was an “other” box where people added other things.  From cadet to paracycling are answers where more than one people mentioned it in the “other” box.  The other types of cycling people mentioned:

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The women’s cycling audience survey – what we did and who responded

In September, Dan and I ran a women’s cycling audience survey.  We did it because, like so many other things we’ve done together, we wanted to see what would happen, and we thought it would be fun.  We had a podcast conversation about the whys and hows, and things that surprised us from the results, but we also wanted to put up a series of posts about what we found.  These will be short posts about different aspects that caught our attention, and at the end I’ll put links into one post, for ease of reference.  But it’s probably a good idea to start with what we did, why, and who responded.

Our methodology

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Thoughts on the 2014/15 transfer season (so far!) – Part 3, the future

I started a mini-series about the 2014-15 road transfer season, and I want to come back to it.  You can read the earlier parts here – Part 1, on how the announcements have been handled and Part 2 on the implications of “Super teams” – but I’ve also been thinking about what the 2014-15 transfer window might mean for the future.  If you need a reminder of what’s changing, I’ve got a transfer table over here on Podium Café.

What this means for 2016 and 2017

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Thoughts on the 2014/15 transfer season (so far!) – part 2, the rise of super-teams

Earlier this week I wrote about how teams have handled their (UCI-level road cycling) transfer announcements, and now I want to look at what it might mean for the peloton in 2015.  As before, this comes with a huge caveat that we don’t know what all the teams look like yet, it’s a snapshot of where we are right now, at the end of October 2014 – here’s the big transfer table (I’ll be updating it throughout November with any more news we see, so if you’re looking at this later in the month and thinking my questions are obviously answered, that’s why)

How the peloton will change in 2015 – more “super-teams”

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