Sarah interviews… Helen Wyman, on her 2017

British cyclocross rider Helen Wyman has always been a fan favourite, and it seems like her racing is getting better than ever.   Winning her fourth Koppenbergcross this season, she was on the podiums of the last two Cyclocross World Cups, and with the weather turning wet, rainy and muddy, just as she likes it, this could be just the beginning of an exciting season.

We talked about what’s made a difference, and how the sport has changed over the last five years – including how Helen’s work on the UCI Cyclocross Commission has contributed to that.   It’s not all 100% positive, and we also talked about the changes Helen would like to see in the future, as well as losing her sponsor at a tricky time.

You can also get automatic updates via our RSS feed here, or via the iTunes store here.

Follow Helen on her instagram, where you can see the videos we talked about, on her twitter, facebook and website.

If you want to re-live some of the races we talked about, there are videos! Bogense CX World Cup highlights and full race replay; Zeven World Cup highlights and full race replay; and highlights of that Koppenbergcross win:

 

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Sarah interviews… Vélofocus’ Sean Robinson on 2017 in women’s cycling

Last week Dan and I podcasted about our favourite racing moments of 2017, but I really wanted to hear about it from other people’s points of view, so I asked Sean Robinson, who, with Balint Hamvas, runs Vélofocus, which take my favourite women’s road cycling images.

Sean has a unique perspective of races, and we talked about his highs and lows of the season, how he thinks 2017 was different, and who we should look out for in 2018.

You can also get automatic updates via our RSS feed here, or via the iTunes store here.

Check out the excellent Vélofocus photography on their website, follow them on instagram, twitter and facebook, and of course, buy their book of the 2017 road season!

Sarah interviews… Marianne Vos, on healing, 2017 goals and her most memorable Giro moments

Marianne Vos‘ life in cycling just keeps on as a roller coaster.  After a well documented bad couple of years with injury and recovery issues, she had a fantastic cyclocross season, but narrowly missed out on winning the 2017 CX World Championships, after an ill-timed chain slip, then had a frustrating Classics season.   She was back on top, winning Gooik in incredible style, and came second behind her team-mate Kasia Niewiadoma in Stage 1 of the OVO Energy Women’s Tour… but then crashed in Stage 3, breaking her collarbone, forcing her to miss some huge goals, the Dutch National Championships and the Giro Rosa.

This week she returns to racing at the BeNe Ladies Tour, and she told me all about how her recovery has gone, and what it was like, watching the team she owns, WM3 Procycling, win the OVO Energy Women’s Tour, and struggle in the Giro.

We also talked about some of her most memorable Giro Rosa moments, and what it’s like to deal with some of the race’s frustrations, with advice for wannabe Giro winners on how to approach it.  I hope you enjoy listening to this conversation as much as I did.

 

You can also get automated, free updates via our RSS feed here, or via our iTunes store page here.

You can find out more about Marianne Vos on her website, and follow her on her twitter, instagram and facebook.

The BeNe Ladies Tour runs from 13th-16th July, and there’s a lot of information on the race website, and facebook, and we can follow on their twitter and the #BNLT17 hashtag.

We talked about some incredible Giro Rosa moments – click through the stage links for lots more videos and links to how the stages went down.

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Rose Manley tells the secrets of cycling TV highlights

It’s the Giro Rosa this week, ten days of grueling racing in Italy, the biggest women’s stage race in the world, and one of the best ways to keep up with the action is the daily highlights videos on the UCI YouTube.

These are part of their commitment to supporting the Women’s WorldTour, and this year, they’re made by Rose Manley, of InCycle TV.  I’ve always enjoyed Rose’s work, so I was delighted when she came on the podcast and told me all about the effort that goes into producing these, and the features she’s been making on various riders throughout the season.

It’s a hard job, for sure, but one that’s so valuable, and I loved her walking through what her (VERY long) day at a race is like, and the highs and lows of working on the WorldTour this season.  Here’s hoping she’s able to get some sleep in Italy!

Listen here, or download from Soundcloud.

 

You can sign up for automatic podcast downloads via the iTunes store here or via our RSS feed here.

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You can find all of Rose’s 2017 WorldTour highlights and features on the UCI YouTube, and more  within the InCycle TV programmes.  Make sure you’re watching the Giro Rosa features every day!

Rose is also on twitter and instagram, and I recommend you follow her there too.

We talked about three specific features that were highlights of Rose’s 2017 so far – the profiles of Kasia Niewiadoma before Strade Bianche, Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio talking about her recovery from her horrible accident, and hanging out with Coryn Rivera at home in California:

Big thanks to my amazing Patreon supporters, who fund me to do this kind of work.  You can join them over here for as little as 2 £/$/€ a month.

Isabelle Clement, Wheels for Wellbeing, and their work helping disabled people cycle more

Isabelle Clement is the director of Wheels for Well-Being, a charity dedicate to helping disabled people cycle more, through both their sessions giving people in London with a hug range of disabilities try a massive range of bikes, and through their national campaigning work.  She told me all about these aspects of her work, and talks about barriers to disabled people cycling, both physical, in terms of infrastructure, and emotional, as well as the charity’s successes, plans for the future, and what we can all do to help support disabled people’s cycling.

Listen here, or download on Soundcloud.

You can sign up for automatic podcast downloads via the iTunes store here or via our RSS feed here.

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Watch these films of Isabelle riding her wheelchair cycle around London and read her article from the Guardian last year about disabled people’s cycling.

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Sarah interviews…. Jenni Gwiazdowski on the London Bike Kitchen

Hopefully you listened to the recent BBC Radio 4 Women’s Hour programme dedicated entirely to women’s cycling, and set at the London Bike Kitchen.  If you did, you will have heard LBK Director Jenni Gwiazdowski talking about their work teaching people to repair their own bikes – or maybe you’ve heard the Wheel Suckers’ podcast Jenni runs with Look Mum No Hands’ Alex Davis, which I was on that same day.

You can imagine, being in the LBK space, and being on the podcast made me want to know a whole lot more – how and why did Jenni set up LBK in the first place, and what do they do?  Why’s she podcasting?  What’s her superhero secret origin story?  There’s only one way to find out – by asking her!

Listen to us here, or download directly from Soundcloud.

 

Watch Jenni teach Woman’s Hour presenter Jane Garvey to change a puncture, and get a good look at the London Bike Kitchen too, here on the BBC website.

 

To find out more about the London Bike Kitchen, head over to their website, and follow them on twitter, instagram and facebook.   There’s information about their Women And Gender-Variant Night here, and the WAG twitter and facebook too – and if you, like me, love the LBK’s work, you can support their work through donating to them, or buying things from their online shop.

Jenni and Alex’s Wheel Suckers podcast can be found on Soundcloud and iTunes (here’s the episode I was on, where I tried to convince Jenni she’d love bike racing…)

To follow Jenni herself (and get all the news about that forthcoming book) head over to her twitter and instagram.

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Big thanks to my amazing Patreon supporters, who make all my work possible.  You can join them over here, from as little as £/$/€ 2 a month.

Sarah interviews… Isla Rowntree, on transforming cycling

Isla Rowntree is most well-known for starting IslaBikes, a company that transformed children’s bicycles, with all kinds of child-friendly innovations.  If you look up reviews, or ask online, they’re always the top recommendation and influencer, and right now there are kids everywhere loving cycling because of Rowntree’s work.

But she’s also helped transform women’s cycling before that, being a key figure in the fight to let women race cyclocross.  When Rowntree started, the GB National Championships were only for men, as were the World Cups and World Championships – and she was a major part of the fight to change that.

And she doesn’t stop taking risks and fighting for change.  Rowntree is currently working on the Imagine Project, to make children’s bikes sustainable, in a future where resources will become scarcer – through recycling, but also exciting new models of renting rather than buying bikes.  It’s a fascinating project – and as she says, a risky one personally and for her company.

We talk about all that, the challenges of effecting change – and you can listen to our conversation, or read the transcript below.

We didn’t get into the questions specifically about children’s bikes, because there are a lot of interviews with Rowntree about that out there.  A selection of interviews and articles:

And more about the Imagine ProjectBBC news item on the Circular Economy and on the project, and interviews on the Guardian and Cyclesprog – and watch the video:

Find out more about Islabikes on their website, twitter, facebook, instagram and YouTube – including their great articles on teaching a child to ride, cycling to school, and lots of ideas and tips including riding as a family, starting kids racing and more. And you can follow Isla Rowntree on her twitter too.

If you want your child to test-ride a bike, there are events all over the UK – including the Islabikes pop-up shop in Battersea, on 7-9th April 2017.

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ProWomensCycling:  Can you start by telling us a little bit about how you got into cycling?

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